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Von Ribbentrop in St Ives
Von Ribbentrop in St Ives

Description

On April 5th 1937, the then German ambassador to Britain, Joachim Von Ribbentrop
left St Ives, where he had been holidaying at the Tregenna Castle Hotel. Although originally an Anglophile, Ribbentrop had experienced a complete volte-face having been mocked in the British newspapers as ‘Brickendrop’, for making a Nazi salute that nearly knocked over the King. While in Cornwall, Ribbentrop made references to his expectations that he would be given a suitable Cornish house – perhaps St Michaels Mount – to live in after a successful German invasion.
The author, Andrew Lanyon, believes that as Ribbentrop departed he was carrying the postcards of the beaches in St. Ives, subsequently captioned in German, that were used to illustrate a German invasion handbook published in early 1941. Almost certainly, he says, it was this little book that was later used by the Luftwaffe pilots bombing and strafing the beaches of St. Ives. And there are more pages in the handbook devoted to St Ives than to anywhere else.

Von Ribbentrop in St Ives

Andrew Lanyon

04/25/2011

ISBN

978-1-905553-76-1

Synopsis

In 1937, the German ambassador to Britain, Von Ribbentrop, left St Ives, where he
had been holidaying, perhaps carrying the postcards of the beaches in St. Ives, subsequently
captioned in German, that were used to illustrate a German invasion handbook. It was this
little book that was later used by the Luftwaffe pilots bombing and strafing the beaches of St.
Ives.

In 1937, the German ambassador to Britain, Von Ribbentrop, left St Ives, where he had been holidaying, perhaps carrying the postcards of the beaches in St. Ives, subsequentlycaptioned in German, that were used to illustrate a German invasion handbook. It was this little book that was later used by the Luftwaffe pilots bombing and strafing the beaches of St.Ives.